Clients

Suzanne Methot has over 20 years’ experience working with schools, post-secondary institutions, teachers, arts and culture institutions, government agencies, and non-profit and community organizations. Past clients include:

Program Development & Project Management

Canadian Race Relations Foundation

Project Consultant: Our Canada

Provided cross-cultural knowledge transfer, devised marketing and community engagement strategies, and organized/facilitated community consultations and other events to ensure that Indigenous perspectives were included in the Canada 150 sesquicentennial celebrations. Coordinated production of an arts-based Educator Guide for elementary and secondary classrooms.

Art Gallery of Ontario

Consultant: NAC 10 Pilot Course

Provided curriculum support, programming ideas, and staff professional development to the AGO for the creation of two guided full-day visits to the AGO for the Toronto District School Board’s NAC 10 pilot course, including ideas for guided tours, themes, inquiry questions, small-group gallery activities, ideas for studio artmaking workshops, and ideas for a culminating activity relating to the curriculum strands Identity and Relationships. The essential questions were “How do art forms reflect the relationships among Aboriginal peoples, their environments, and the society in which they were/are produced?” and “How do traditional and contemporary Aboriginal art forms reflect both the personal and cultural identity of Aboriginal artists?”

YWCA Elm Centre

Community Art Project Coordinator

Conceptualized and designed a community-based, indoor visual art project for the entranceway of a highrise building in downtown Toronto housing Indigenous women and families. Designed project plan for community consultations, mechanisms for ongoing feedback and evaluation, project timeline, schedule of meetings and presentations, general project goals and guidelines, and worked within limitations and constraints intrinsic to the site. The goal of the project was to create art that reflected the knowledge and experience of the women in the community, anchoring the site in a way that is relevant to the women and their diverse values, cultures, and histories. Designed the project plan, created all the tenant resource materials, facilitated the community consultations, and facilitated the on-site tenant art-making over a series of weeks.

 

Lecturer/Guest Speaker

Royal Ontario Museum, Learning Department

Keynote Speaker: “Cultural Perspectives in Education”

Discussed the role and purpose of education in Indigenous cultures, indigenizing Canadian systems and institutions, how to authentically represent Indigenous peoples on ROM tours, engaging learners with object-based learning, and how the work of ROM educators ties into the current need for reconciliation in Canada. Because the ROM’s annual staff professional development day was held at the Dodem Kanonhsa clan lodge, the keynote remarks were delivered within a storytelling format, including cultural teachings and song.

Ontario Library Association Super Conference

Guest Speaker: Libraries and Community Engagement

Discussed principles, techniques, and strategies for Indigenous community engagement, including cultural considerations. Spoke about how libraries can move from community consultation to community-led service planning, how library programming and collections can connect to advocacy, and how First Nations libraries can play a role in community empowerment.

York University Faculty of Environmental Studies

Guest Lecturer: Taking Action — Engaging People & the Environment

Using visual images and critical inquiry, lectured on the connection between environmental issues and power relations (including race, class, gender, and colonialism) and how ecological justice is connected to decolonization and social justice. Discussed sustainability and relationships; encouraged critical thinking about notions of poverty and development; highlighted the connection between violence against women and violence against the earth; showed how global matters (such as free trade agreements) are expressed in local environmental issues; and discussed the many ways we can all take action. Students in this course identify, research, and act on local and global issues of environmental and social justice. Working in small groups, they conduct collaborative research, social analysis, and action planning to present creative workshops that combine praxis and pedagogy.

First Nations Technical Institute, Aboriginal Media Program

Guest Facilitator: Media Coverage of Aboriginal Issues

Facilitated sessions for first-year print and television media students on employment legislation, copyright, libel, writing queries, liaising with editors, meeting deadlines, and working in cross-cultural environments. This course is a key strand in the Media Program,where learners ask critical questions about how media in the dominant society covers issues of critical interest to Indigenous communities and peoples. Compared coverage of Indigenous stories in non-Indigenous and Indigenous media and identified reasons for the differences; discussed issues facing journalists working in Indigenous communities, such as language, technology, and cultural differences; studied how journalists can establish the credibility of sources and the relationship between colonialism and internalized racism; and examined the systemic and structural bases for stereotypes, bias, and discrimination as they apply to Indigenous peoples in Canadian society.

University of Toronto School of Continuing Studies

Guest Lecturer: Focus on First Nations

Lectured on Aboriginal literature (oral and written). This course focused on the arts of the First Nations, including the renaissance of First Nations art, music, theatre, and literature since the 1960s. Each session was facilitated by expert First Nations artists, writers, and guest speakers including Tom Hill of the Woodland Cultural Centre on the art of iron workers and Drew Hayden Taylor on Native theatre.

Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (University of Toronto)

Guest Speaker: Music AQ (Honours Specialist I & II)

Delivered a presentation on infusing Indigenous perspectives into the Arts curriculum. Co-facilitated the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education lesson plan Soundscape Composition Through the Medicine Wheel.

Baycrest Public School, Toronto District School Board

Storyteller

Shared stories from First Nations oral tradition as an invited storyteller during a Family Evening of Literacy and Storytelling.

Joyce Avenue Public School, Toronto District School Board

Storyteller

Told stories from First Nations oral tradition to students in grades 4-6 during a special afternoon gathering.

Southern Ontario Library Service, First Nations Libraries' Advisory Committee

Keynote Speaker: Spring Gathering

Spoke about standards of criticism as they apply to literature written by or about Indigenous peoples; the pedagogy of oral storytelling; contemporary Indigenous literatures; and issues of authorship and appropriation. Created a checklist so attendees could review the content of books already in, or being considered for inclusion in, their library collection.

Desh Pardesh: 8th Annual Intra-National Festival and Conference

Panelist/Presenter: Long-Term Effects of Immigration on First Nations Communities

Is immigration a form of colonization? How do we talk about post-colonialism while living on land that has not experienced “independence” as South Asian countries know it? What is the relationship between Indigenous peoples and recent immigrants? If immigration is a means to a “better life,” what are the questions of power and privilege inherent in this choice? What constitutes a better life, and how does it affect other people? This panel explored immigration from the perspective of Indigenous peoples and ways for activists and cultural producers to create awareness of and solidarity with Indigenous peoples.

 

Session/Circle Facilitator

Queenston Drive Public School

Facilitator

Designed and facilitated in-depth learning circles for students from grades 1-8, focusing on Indigenous dance. The session focused on the importance of the drum within Indigenous cultures, historical and contemporary forms of dance, and the ways that dance (and other celebrations) can be used to create cross-cultural relationships. As part of the session, students took part in a round dance, where they experienced what it means to develop skills in balance, empathy, and healthy relationships.

Durham College, School of Media, Art & Design

Facilitator

Designed and facilitated an all-day professional development session for instructors seeking to Indigenize the college’s curriculum. The session focused on pre-contact Indigenous knowledge and practice, treaties and colonization, deconstructing myths and stereotypes, and best practices in Indigenous education. Using resources introduced during this session, instructors were asked to conceptualize how Canadian institutions might move from inclusion to reconciliation.

Toronto Green Community, Rivers Rising Project

Facilitator

Designed and facilitated two training sessions focusing on anti-oppression, cross-cultural communication, and “Indigenous Canada 101” for the Rivers Rising community engagement project in Parkdale and St. James Town. The essential questions were “Who are we?,” “How do we fit together?”, “How can we work together?”, and “What does it mean to be a tour guide on this land, with this history, today?”

Royal Ontario Museum, Learning Department

Facilitator

Invited to participate in the ROM’s “Indigenous Knowledge and Decolonizing Education” professional development day. Designed and facilitated three consecutive small-group sessions on treaty education and the ROM collection.

Avondale Alternative School, Toronto District School Board

Presenter

Developed and facilitated sessions with a JK/K class, a Grade 1/2 class, a Grade 2/3 class, a Grade 4 class, a Grade 5/6 class, and a Grade 7/8 class during three day-long sessions. Devised a series of learning stations for the Kindergarten sessions, including traditional games, creation stories, investigating math concepts through physical activity, investigating Indigenous clan systems through role play, and Indigenous musical traditions. Primary sessions focused on roles and responsibilities within pre- and post-contact Indigenous families and societies, culminating in a language-based tipi-teaching activity. The Grade 4 session focused on the “discovery myth” and the effect of colonization on Indigenous peoples. The Grade 5/6 session focused on the impact of resource exploration on Indigenous peoples and communities through Indigenous oral tradition. The Intermediate session focused on geography (land forms), mapping, and investigating different perspectives on mining and resource exploration on Indigenous communities.

Royal Ontario Museum, Learning Department

Facilitator

Designed and facilitated a half-day professional development session on myths and stereotypes about Indigenous peoples, as well as Best Practices in Indigenous education. Designed and facilitated small-group activities on the ways myths and stereotypes become rooted in society, and how to connect object-based learning to Best Practices theory.

Toronto Green Community/City of Toronto Parks

Facilitator

Developed a half-day session for the Eglinton Park Heritage Community Garden “Great Garden Adventure” children’s program. Designed and facilitated engaging outdoor Indigenous games and activities to build children’s understanding of ecosystems and the human connection to and impact on the environment, as well as Indigenous perspectives on sustainable farming and food security. Session activities also included connections to local Indigenous history, as the Community Garden is located on the site of a former Haudenosaunee village now known as the Jackes-Allenby archaeological site.

David Hornell Junior School, Toronto District School Board

Presenter

Developed and facilitated a half-day presentation on hiphop as the new oral tradition, to build student understanding of Indigenous perspectives as well as contemporary and historical issues affecting Indigenous communities. The session included analysis of pre-contact oral texts, creation stories, and an overview of contemporary Indigenous hiphop from Canada, the United States, and Latin America.

Corsair Public School, Peel District School Board

Presenter

Developed and facilitated a day-long series of 40-minute assemblies for 1,000 students from Grade 1 to Grade 6. Each assembly featured archival photographs, video, and an exploration of the importance of the heartbeat rhythm, as students learned the round dance and its associated conceptual framework (friendship, cooperation, and interconnectedness).

Avondale Alternative School, Toronto District School Board

Presenter

Developed and facilitated sessions with a Kindergarten class, a Grade 1/2 class, a Grade 2/3 class, a Grade 3/4 class, and a Grade 7/8 class. Devised a series of learning stations for the Kindergarten session. The Primary sessions focused on conflict and cooperation between Indigenous peoples and settlers, and changes to First Nations cultures since contact, as students learned about Indigenous science and medicine. The Grade 3/4 session focused on cooperation and conflict between Indigenous peoples and settlers and the contributions Indigenous peoples have made to Canadian society, through the exploration of wampum belts and the Haudenosaunee Confederacy and its impact on federalist governance in the Americas. The half-day Grade 7/8 session focused on the impact of Confederation and the policies of Sir John A. Macdonald on First Nations peoples on the Prairies, and how the events of Confederation and the signing of the numbered treaties continues to affect the relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada.

St. Anthony Elementary School, Dufferin-Peel Catholic District School Board

Presenter

Developed and facilitated sessions with two Grade 3 classes, focusing on conflict and cooperation between Indigenous peoples and settlers and cultural continuity and change in First Nations communities, as students learned the round dance.

Avondale Alternative School, Toronto District School Board

Presenter

Developed and facilitated sessions with a Grade 2/3 class, a Grade 3/4 class, and a Grade 5/6 class. The Grade 2/3 session focused on conflict and cooperation between Indigenous peoples and settlers, as students negotiated an agreement to share land and resources, and learned the round dance (which embodies Cree teachings on friendship and cooperation). The Grade 3/4 session focused on truths and stereotypes about Indigenous peoples through the examination of sports logos and mascots, how stereotypical ideas began, and how they are replayed in contemporary media and culture. The half-day Grade 5/6 session focused on the impact of the Indian Act on Indigenous cultures, economic development, and self-determination, and the impact this race-based legislation has had on the relationship between Indigenous peoples and Canadians.

Avondale Alternative School, Toronto District School Board

Presenter

Facilitated half-day sessions with a Grade 5/6 class and a Grade 7/8 class. The Grade 5/6 session focused on Indigenous worldviews on biodiversity and sustainability; how the students’ daily diet reflects issues of biodiversity and sustainability; and Indigenous perspectives on development. The Grade 7/8 session focused on deconstructing common myths and stereotypes about Indigenous peoples; the monolithic representation of Indigenous peoples (particularly the “warrior” image); how those ideas began and how they are replayed in contemporary media and culture; and how media representations of Indigenous peoples frame citizen understanding of the culture of protest.

Kikendawt Kinoomaadii Kamig, Dokis First Nation

Presenter

Facilitated a day-long interactive session with a small group of students from JK to Grade 4 that brought ancient teachings into the contemporary world and into the lives of students attending an on-reserve school. The session focused on the Idle No More movement’s use of the round dance as non-violent protest; how the Seven Sacred Teachings connect to environmental stewardship, personal growth, and community cohesion; and how Indigenous cultures have grown and changed.

Avondale Alternative School, Toronto District School Board

Presenter

Facilitated sessions with Primary and Junior students focusing on the ways in which human activities alter the environment; how the environment affects human activity; how natural features of the environment influence land use and contribute to differences in local, national, and global communities; the science of plants as medicine and the role plants play in contemporary pharmaceuticals; how Indigenous science and medicine have developed over generations; the positive and negative effects of contact on Indigenous medicine; and how Canada is made up of various communities that have diverse traditions. Students participated in a hands-on herbal tea-tasting activity featuring three commonly used herbal remedies: thyme, peppermint, and dandelion. The sessions emphasized visual literacy skills and encouraged students to make connections between Indigenous traditions and their own cultural practices.

St. James Town Community Café

Workshop Facilitator

Facilitated a workshop on the principles of restorative practice and the use of proactive and responsive circles. Used visual diagrams, activities, and critical inquiry to develop understanding about critical issues in restorative practice; the types and uses of circles; the facilitator role; and affective statements and questions.

Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (Summer Academy 2013)

Guest Facilitator: The Classroom, the Community, the World!

Provided frameworks for infusing Indigenous issues and perspectives into the classroom; demonstrated culturally relevant activities educators can implement in their programs to encourage character education and critical thinking; and spoke about the effects of intergenerational trauma and what the legacy of residential schools means for educators who want to partner with Indigenous peoples and communities. In this course, educators explore how to develop local and global community partnerships and empower students to be active community members through cross-curricular activities that encourage inquiry and critical thinking skills in the areas of literacy, social studies, and science.

St. James Town Community Café

Circle Facilitator

Facilitated a talking circle for the St. James Town Community Café. This community-based social enterprise promotes social inclusion and food security in a low-income, underserved neighbourhood through neighbourhood partnerships that promote culture, art, identity, participation, cultural competency, health, and wellness. The St. James Town Community Café is a consensus-based collective owned and operated by people who reflect the diversity of the community.

Finch Public School, Toronto District School Board

Presenter

Facilitated sessions with Junior students focusing on myths, stereotypes, and realities about Indigenous peoples, communities, and identities. Facilitated a session with Primary students focusing on medicinal plants and the positive and negative effects of contact on Indigenous medicine. The Junior sessions emphasized visual literacy skills and text-to-world/text-to-self connections, while the Primary session employed a tea-tasting exercise that encouraged students to make connections between Indigenous medicine and their own cultural practices.

Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (Summer Academy 2012)

Guest Facilitator: The Classroom, the Community, the World!

Provided an overview of contemporary social issues in Indigenous communities and their connection to colonialism; facilitated a discussion on community-driven initiatives at healing and reconciliation and how they might become areas of study in the classroom; demonstrated how educators can use Best Practices to successfully infuse Indigenous issues across the curriculum; and facilitated a small-group activity that helped educators learn how to independently evaluate classroom resources. This course focuses on developing local and global community partnerships and how students can be active community members through participation in cross-curricular activities that encourage inquiry and critical thinking skills. Participants learn how to layer and infuse social issues into their programs; how students can become peace mediators; how students can take leadership roles in addressing social and environmental issues; and how educators can encourage empathy and activism in the classroom.

Finch Public School, Toronto District School Board

Guest Speaker

Shared a read-aloud and spoke with students about the words “myth,” “legend,” and “folk tale” so they could increase their knowledge of literature genres and problematize how we describe the knowledge of marginalized cultures. Also discussed fairness in relationships and the place of the Trickster figure in Indigenous cultures.

Maplewood High School, Toronto District School Board

Storyteller/Guest Speaker: Lessons From the Medicine Wheel

Shared the Cree creation story and teachings on the medicine wheel in two sessions at a specialized learning community for students with special needs. The sessions drew parallels between Maplewood’s focus on personal and social responsibility and the ways in which the medicine wheel helps us understand the principles of respect, responsibility, reciprocity, and relationships. The sessions also focused on the power of reflection, self-awareness, and personal choice, in keeping with Maplewood’s aim to develop each student’s unique potential by teaching social skills and fostering lifelong learning. This event was very successful in encouraging self-identification of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit students among Maplewood’s diverse student population.

Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (Summer Academy 2010 & 2011)

Guest Facilitator: The Classroom, the Community, the World

Delivered a half-day presentation on First Nations, Métis, and Inuit perspectives; building relationships with Indigenous and other at-risk students; and teaching strategies that infuse Indigenous perspectives into the classroom and curriculum. This workshop centres on setting up a safe and caring classroom (including goal setting and individualized programming for students); mediation; developing community partnerships; and ideas for social action.

Toronto District School Board, Central Coordinating Office for Aboriginal Education

Co-Presenter: 2nd Annual Equity Representatives’ Symposium

Co-facilitated a discussion on understanding Indigenous worldviews, infusing Indigenous perspectives into the curriculum, and equity-based teaching approaches and best practices in Indigenous education. Opened the symposium by singing the “Strong Woman Song,” using shakers and drum, prior to the keynote address.

Toronto Green Community/Sustainability Network

Facilitator: Environment and Diversity Project Special Event

Co-facilitated a tour of Toronto from an Indigenous cultural and historical perspective and facilitated a post-tour discussion on how non-profit organizations, social justice groups, faith groups, educators, arts groups, and community and social service organizations might collaborate with Indigenous organizations and communities to work together on common goals.

 

Curriculum Writer & Resource Developer

Scholastic Canada (Forthcoming)

Content Provider: Reconciliation Classroom Resource

Wrote three articles for a forthcoming resource book for Grades 4–6 that is part of Scholastic’s “Take Action” series focusing on ethical citizenship, social justice, and sustainability. Interviewed Indigenous elders across Canada to write an article on the role of elders in Indigenous communities; researched the importance of storytelling in Indigenous cultures to write an article on oral tradition; and contributed a chapter introduction describing First Nations peoples and cultures.

Scholastic Canada

Content Provider: Animal Relations Classroom Resource

Researched Indigenous perspectives on animals for an article in Animal Relations, a resource book for Grades 4–6 that is part of Scholastic’s “Take Action” series focusing on ethical citizenship, social justice, and sustainability. The article focused on animals in the Indigenous worldview, and on historical and contemporary hunting and sustainability practices for the James Bay Cree, Inuit, Plains Cree, Mi’Kmaq, and Tlingit peoples.

Scholastic Canada

Content Provider: Earth Action Classroom Resource

Interviewed elder and knowledge keeper Umeek Richard Atleo and elder and educator Sheryl Thompson for an article in Earth Action, a resource book for Grades 4–6 that is part of Scholastic’s “Take Action” series focusing on ethical citizenship, social justice, and sustainability. The article focused on Indigenous perspectives on sustainability.

Scholastic Canada

Content Provider: Are You Hungry? Classroom Resource

Wrote two articles for Are You Hungry?, a resource book for Grades 4–6 that is part of Scholastic’s “Take Action” series focusing on ethical citizenship, social justice, and sustainability. Researched and wrote an opinion piece about food (in-)security in remote communities across Canada, including First Nations communities and the North, that touched upon issues of accessibility, poverty, biodiversity, climate change, and colonial changes to Indigenous economic systems. Also interviewed Inuk elder and knowledge keeper Joe Karetak to write an article about the Young Hunters Program at the Arviat Wellness Centre.

Scholastic Canada

Content Provider: Activist Art Classroom Resource

Interviewed A Tribe Called Red and created a Q&A-style interview piece for Activist Art, a resource book for Grades 4–6 that is part of Scholastic’s “Take Action” series focusing on ethical citizenship, social justice, and sustainability. Researched the band’s music, video art, and electric powwow events and formulated interview questions that would provide students with information on how ATCR’s art has sparked cross-cultural discussion on Indigenous rights and cultural appropriation, as well as Indigenous perspectives on the importance of the arts in creating social change. Article was formatted to familiarize students with conventions of text.

Scholastic Canada

Content Provider: Community Cares Classroom Resource

Wrote about Indigenous perspectives on community for Community Cares, a resource book for Grades 4–6 that is part of Scholastic’s “Take Action” series focusing on ethical citizenship, social justice, and sustainability. Interviewed Indigenous peoples from different age groups and various regions in Canada to provide students with information on Indigenous concepts of community; how children, youth, and elders contribute to community-building; and the ways in which Indigenous peoples keep their communities safe and healthy in both pre-contact and contemporary eras.

Centre3 for Print & Media Arts

Resource Developer: Shelley Niro — Seeing with Memory Teachers’ Resource Guide

Partnered with Centre3 in Hamilton, Ontario, to develop a new teachers’ resource guide based on the work of Mohawk artist Shelley Niro. Using Niro’s video Suite: Indian, the series of prints entitled Resting with Warriors, and the photo/video series M: Stories of Women, Centre3 is working with schools in priority neighbourhoods to engage students in grades 7, 8, 9, and 10 in movement, printmaking, and photography activities that validate Indigenous knowledge as well as the learners’ own cultural heritage. The series of school- and studio-based workshops will be documented and the students’ artworks reproduced in a resource guide that will assist teachers across the province in using arts education techniques and infusing Indigenous perspectives into the provincial curriculum.

Web Networks

Curriculum Writer/Resource Developer: Yodigo

Partnered with web.net to deliver a new tool for Indigenous language revitalization and improved English literacy. Using proven methods from video games and traditional literacy instruction, this multimedia app allows Indigenous communities to develop, share, and archive community narratives, oral stories, and student writing by creating culturally relevant content that fosters community participation, empowerment, and Indigenous ways of knowing, teaching, and learning. Created lessons that promote ancestral languages and encourage culturally relevant English literacy education; also designed lesson-creation workshops focusing on cross-generational engagement and critical approaches to literacy.

Joyce Avenue Public School, Toronto District School Board

Storyteller/Resource Writer: Walking With My Kokum

Wrote an original story for students in grades 2 and 3; did a read-aloud; and discussed central themes including the environment, respect, diversity, family connections, language, and home cultures. This work was part of a partnership between Joyce PS and the York University Faculty of Education to research emergent multi-literacies and improve elementary literacy education in a diverse, urban, digitally socialized population. The project planned, developed, shared, documented, and showcased narrative rewriting projects in the Primary and Junior grades. Children learned traditional stories from the inside out, becoming writers (through story adaptation), performers (of plays), narrators (of videos and DVDs), programmers (of mini-games and hypertext stories), as well as readers familiar with canonical literature from diverse cultures. They learned to develop their voices by incorporating familial, community, pop culture, and academic knowledge and to experience literacy as a critical and creative process. Two central ideas underlined this part of the project: promoting the use of students’ first languages and enabling students to reinterpret traditional narratives in a contemporary medium.

Pearson Education Canada, K-12 School Division

Member of the Author Team: Aboriginal Beliefs, Values, and Aspirations (Native Studies 11)

Co-authored Chapter 9 (“Education For Life”) and contributed text to Chapter 3 (“Economy, Trade, and Resources”) and Chapter 6 (“Governance”). Created skills-building activities, reflection questions, graphic organizers, and in-text features; interviewed students and community members for “Voices of the People” segments throughout the text; and researched and wrote material for the Teacher’s Resource Guide.

Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Film Festival

Curriculum Writer: Education and Youth Programs

Researched and wrote education packages linking documentary films to Grade 11/12 Native Studies, English, and Arts curricula and Grade 7/8 Science, History, and Arts curricula. Created pre-viewing, viewing, post-viewing, and extension activities and devised teacher prompts, teaching strategies, lesson plans, and rubrics specific to each film.

Ontario Ministry of Education

Curriculum Writer: Teacher’s Toolkit

Created elementary Science, Math, Social Studies, and Language teaching strategies and activities for the Ministry of Education’s online Teacher’s Toolkit.

Ontario Teachers' Federation

Editor: Hearing Every Voice, Seeing Every Face

Completed a substantive edit on and contributed new research and text to a teachers’ resource manual. Content included key elements of the Ministry of Education’s Ontario First Nations, Métis, and Inuit Education Policy Framework; terminology; historical background to and current issues in Indigenous communities; Indigenous learning styles; and best practices for integrating Indigenous perspectives across the curriculum.

Toronto District School Board, Central Coordinating Office for Aboriginal Education

Curriculum Writer

Developed, wrote, and compiled elementary and secondary curriculum resource packages to assist classroom teachers in infusing Indigenous perspectives across the curriculum.

Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (U of T), Initial Teacher Education

Curriculum Writer: Soundscape Composition Through the Medicine Wheel

This lesson plan, co-written by three teachers in collaboration with staff from the education department of the Native Canadian Centre of Toronto, provides teacher candidates at OISE with a classroom resource that showcases Indigenous perspectives. The lesson plan allows teacher candidates to bring Indigenous perspectives into their music and movement classes; helps students make connections among their home cultures, Canadian culture, and Indigenous cultures; and allows students to reflect on their relationship to the world around them.

 

Panel Moderator

Resistance, Representation & Colonialism: 2-Spirit & Indigenous Sexualities

Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies, University of Toronto

Moderated a panel that explored Indigenous resilience and resistance to settler colonial constructs of Indigenous gender and sexuality, featuring visual artist Kent Monkman, poet Gwen Benaway, youth advocates Teddy Syrette and Neno Ochrym, and HIV/AIDS activist Ed Bennett. This panel was part of the 2017 Bonham Centre Awards Gala, honouring Kent Monkman, Candy Palmater, Teddy Syrette, and Lee Maracle for their work in promoting Indigenous sexual diversity.

Indigenous Peoples and Canada 150

Canadian Race Relations Foundation

Moderated an all-day community consultation at Laurentian University in Sudbury, Ontario, to document Indigenous perspectives on Canadian identity and the Canada 150 celebrations. Participants included Sheila Cote-Meek (author of Colonized Classrooms: Racism, Trauma and Resistance in Post-Secondary Education), Madeleine Redfern (mayor of Iqaluit, NT), and representatives from the Native Women’s Association of Canada and the Trent University Indigenous Studies Department.

Arts Education & Indigenous Community Development

ArtsSmarts 2012 Knowledge Exchange

Moderated a panel at the annual ArtsSmarts conference in Calgary, Alberta, featuring Métis filmmaker Marcel Petit and educators from across Canada, to discuss the benefits of arts education for Indigenous youth, and how arts education projects can be used to spark critical questioning around colonialism — as well as possibilities for action and change.

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